Skeena Summer Climate Conditions: How is it affecting wild salmon?

It’s hot in the Skeena! Like much of the province, we are seeing unusually high temperatures and low water levels throughout the region… and it’s only the start of August. A combination of warming ocean temperatures, early snowpack melt, low and warm water temperatures have set the stage for what could be a challenging year for Skeena salmon and steelhead.

 

The Skeena and many of its tributaries are currently at water levels well below historic averages, in many cases below historic minimums, with water temperatures well above average. These conditions add stress to migrating salmon and could influence spawning habitat availability and success if similar conditions continue into the fall. Warm ocean temperatures mean less food, changing currents and predators. Salmon are resilient and will adapt, but it’s important for us to understand environmental conditions and challenges our salmon will be facing this year.

 

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Spotlight

B.C. conservation organizations fight Alaskan salmon “sustainable” certification

British Columbia conservation organizations SkeenaWild Conservation Trust and Raincoast Conservation Foundation, along with Watershed Watch Salmon Society, have filed a formal notice of objection with the U.K.-based Marine Stewardship Council in response to the proposed re-certification of Alaskan salmon fisheries as sustainable.

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Spotlight

Community Event: Earth Day Garbathon

To celebrate this year's Earth Day, join SkeenaWild, Greater Terrace Beautification Society, City of Terrace and Regional District or Kitimat-Stikine to clean up our communities, trails and rivers on Sunday, April 21st, 2024!

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Spotlight

Alaska’s Dirty Secret: Send sustainable seafood verifiers a message

Fishers in Southeast Alaska intercept and sell millions of salmon and steelhead migrating to British Columbia, Washington and Oregon in non-selective net fisheries that don't adequately report their bycatch. All while our local fisheries are closed to rebuild dwindling stocks.

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